Bullous pemphigoid

Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune disorder. If you have it, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your skin and mouth, causing blisters and sores. No one knows the cause. Bullous pemphigoid does not spread from person to person. It does not appear to be inherited. But some people’s genes put them more at risk for bullous pemphigoid. Bullous pemphigoid is most common in older adults and may be fatal for older, sick patients. Bullous pemphigoid usually occurs in elderly persons and is rare in young people.

Symptoms come and go. In most patients, the condition goes away within 5 years. Some people have no symptoms. Others may have mild redness, itching and irritation. In severe cases, they are multiple blisters, called bullae. Blisters are usually located on the arms, legs, or middle of the body. About one-third of persons with bullous pemphigoid also develop blisters in the mouth. The blisters may break open and form ulcers or open sores. Bullous pemphigoid usually responds well to treatment. Most patients stop taking medicine after several years. The disease sometimes returns after treatment is stopped.

Disease Information